NEWS

NEWS

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FEEDBACK LOOPS AT GREY HOUSE FOUNDATION KRAKOW.

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Thank you to all those who came to Feedback Loops at The Grey House Foundation, Gallery Szara Kamienica in Krakow between the 14th of May to the 11th of June 2016.

For all of you who could not make it here are some installation images., including documentation of the three channel installation version of Time of the Glacier 2.35:1,  39 min (2014) and one wall of the first gallery space.

 

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CULTURE AND CLIMATE CHANGE: FUTURE SCENARIOS

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I am delighted to announce that Lena Dobrowolska and myself  have been selected to participate in the yearlong Culture and Climate Change: Future scenarios networked residency supported by the Jerwood Charitable Foundation alongside Emma Critchley and Zoë Svendson. The experimental networked residency which will begin in July 2016 will enable us to collaborate with climate research and policy knowledge networks at the University of Sheffield, The Open University and the Ashden Trust and is supported by an award worth £10,000.  To find out more about Culture and Climate Change visit HERE.

 

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FEEDBACK LOOPS AT GREY HOUSE FOUNDATION KRAKOW.

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Feedback Loops is now open at The Grey House Foundation, Gallery Szara Kamienica in Krakow from the 14th of May to the 11th of June 2016. This presentation  of Feedback loops includes a three channel installation version of Time of the Glacier (2014).

The Grey House Foundation, Gallery Szara Kamienica, Rynek Główny 6, Kraków, Poland.

Tuesday to Friday 13.00-18.00

Saturday and Sunday 12.00-16.00

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FEEDBACK LOOPS CROWDFUNDER: TARGET REACHED!

FEEDBACK LOOPS SUCESS

We have made it to our goal of £800, with six days to go!

It is simply not enough just saying thank you, but THANK YOU very much to all those who have helped along the way by backing and sharing our campaign.

Though we have reach our goal you can still support our project and get one of the FEEDBACK LOOPS  perks by contributing HERE! any additional funding will simply  increase the number of rolls of film that we will have to work with.

We have been overwhelmed by the response to our on going work and the support that we have revived.

Thank you

Teo and Lena

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FEEDBACK LOOPS CROWDFUNDER

FEEDBACK LOOPS CROWD FUNDING

 

We need your help to continue to develop this ambitious long term project in 2016.

Please visit our crowd funding campaign HERE and let as many friends, family and anyone who might be interested know about it.

We are trying to raise £800 in 28 days to help cover the cost of medium format film, processing and scanning.

Thank you

Teo and Lena

ABOUT OUR PROJECT

Lena Dobrowolska & Teo Ormond-Skeaping, A meditation on the digital divide (2015), Archival giclée print from medium format negative, 110×87 cm

Feedback Loops is an ongoing body of work on The Tibetan Plateau that began in 2012.

Since 2012 we have been to the Tibetan Plateau in China three times to producemedium format film photographs and an artist film and now in 2016 we will visit where the Himalayan mountains meet the Tibetan Plateau in Nepal.

Within our work we depict the high altitude plains, geological formations and glaciers, inhabitants and man made topographies of the Tibetan Plateau, documenting development, pollution, desertification and glacial retreat. Working with the region’s cultural archaeology to intertwine the ecological and cultural significance of the Plateau, a place revered as the symbolic threshold of human exploration, spirituality and as a crucial climatic component in global warming.

Known as the Third Pole the Tibetan Plateau plays a significant role in global climate and the Asian water cycle. Rising temperatures on the Tibetan Plateau have resulted in rapid glacial retreat and desertification as the permafrost melts and the fragile grass lands deteriorate. As the water tower of Asia dries up hydropolitical tension is increasing in Asia and the plateaus influence on the formation of high pressure systems in Eurasia is felt as far away as Europe where summer heat waves have broken all records.

The name Feedback Loops is intended to imply that every action humanity takes has consequences that return to shape the future in a way we cannot foresee.

 

WHAT WE NEED

Lena Dobrowolska & Teo Ormond-Skeaping, The endurance of altruism (2015), Archival giclée print from medium format negative, 110×87 cm

We work completely independently, trekking and camping we spend a significant amount of time in the landscape to create our work.

Our work is produced as a response to the environments which we experience and is informed by rigorous, interdisciplinary research into climate change, Geo-politics and the Anthropocene, which is why our objectives are so ambitious.

We have saved enough money (£1200 each) to cover most of the cost of the 1.5 month production period including: return flights, accommodation, insurance, permits to access mountain regions, food and transport.

We only need your help to cover the cost of shooting on medium format film, processing and scanning it.

Here is exactly how the £800 pounds will be used:
£390  for 100 rolls of Kodak Portra 160 Medium format Colour Film
£284 for processing 100 rolls of colour film
£126 for 5 days scanning on an Imacom Flextight scanner

Why film you might ask?

We work with the best analogue cameras and lenses in regions where we cannot charge batteries every day and we strongly believe that film still offers the best artistic and aesthetic quality available.

HOW WILL IT HELP US

Lena Dobrowolska & Teo Ormond-Skeaping, Limits to growth (2015), Archival giclée print from medium format negative, 110×87 cm

Your contribution will not only facilitate our making of photographs during this production period but will secure the continuation of our ambitious project.

We are working towards creating a large body of work that will be presented as a book, more exhibitions, screenings and events.

In May of this year we are again showing Feedback loops as a solo show in The Grey House gallery in Krakow Poland and we hope to secure many more opportunities to share our work in the future in the UK and internationally.

REWARDS

If you choose to help us you will be rewarded in one of the following ways, to find out more visit our campaign page!

THANK YOU-  Every one who contributes will feature on our websites, on the wall in future exhibitions and in  a future publication as a supporter.

FILM LINK-  A link to the password protected full length artist film, see an excerpt below.

SET OF 3 POSTCARDS–  A set of 3 postcards with photographs from the “Feedback Loops” project, 350 gsm premium paper.

NEWSPAPER–  A specially designed limited exhibition catalogue A3 newspaper, including 15 images from the “Feedback Loops” project with captions and a feedback diagram.

POSTERS–  Set of 2 or set of 4 limited edition “Feedback Loops” posters, 100 x 70 cm edition of 200 & 100.
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EXETER PHOENIX TALK AND SCREENING, TIME OF THE GLACIER & FEED BACK LOOPS

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Film still from Time Of The Glacier, Teo ormond-Skeaping, HD, 53min 2014. 

 Lena Dobrowolska and Teo Ormond-Skeaping

A film screening of “Time of the Glacier” (53min) followed by an artist performance lecture and Q&A session. This session also includes a presentation of recent photographic work “Feedback Loops” from the Tibetan Plateau.

Presented as part of Exeter Phoenix’s Tuesday Collective a monthly inspirational nights featuring a program of talks, screenings and events exploring the creative world of moving image, art and culture.

Tuesday 19th January 7pm

Address: Gandy St, Exeter, Devon EX4 3LS
Phone:01392 667080

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KULTURA DO KWADRATU INTERVIEW ON FEEDBACK LOOPS 

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Limits to growth
110x87cm, Giclée Print from Medium Format Colour Negetive. (2015).

KULTURA DO KWADRATU: Today’s guests of “Kultura do kwadratu” are a Polish-British photographic collaboration Lena Dobrowolska and Teo Ormond-Skeaping. Your latest exhibition Sprzezenia zwrotne/ Feedback Loops is currently being shown in Wroclaw’s gallery Miejsce przy miejscu (MpM).

It consists of large-format photographs and artist film installation, which were made on the Tibetan Plateau since 2013. How did you end up going there? What made you direct your camera at this subject matter?

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: In our independent practices we have both previously made work about the landscape and the tangible climate of impending ecological disaster.

In 2012 Teo was awarded the red mansion prize while he was at the Slade school of art in London which took him to china for an artist residency, after the residence at his invitation we traveled to the west of china where we first visited the Tibetan Plateau.

During that first trip we both made works that responded to that first experience of being in china and we both felt afterwards that there was more work to be done on the Tibetan Plateau.

As we researched the Tibetan Plateau we were struck by its geopolitical and environmental significance and we both felt that we had not seen any accomplished photographs that represented the areas importance.

We returned to focus on the Plateau in 2013 with the support of another grant still working independently; Lena worked with photography and Teo with artist’s film.

It was only on our third trip that we began to work together on the photograph having re-evaluated what we had already done and feeling that in order to adequately produce such an ambitious body of work that was logistically challenging and concerning such important issues it would be best if we worked together.

KULTURA DO KWADRATU: Can you explain what lies behind the name, which is the title of the exhibition -Feedback Loops? How do you understand it?

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: The name “feedback loops” derives from Jay Forester’s famous cybernetic systems theory, cybernetics groups scientific theories in order to make visible the mechanism by which each one influences the others, this mechanism is called feedback. This theory allows scientist to see unforeseen changes.

The mechanism of feedback has been studied and applied to many branches of science, especially climatology, for example it is fundamental part of the mechanics of global warming.

We intend the idea of feedback to imply that every action humanity takes has consequences that return to shape the future in a way that cannot be foreseen.

KULTURE DO KWADRATU: The main subject of your photography is landscape. Why? It is able to say more than the people or their creations?

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: We do not have a hierarchy, when we photograph a landscape or a person or a motorcycle we think of them as equal. This is because we don’t think that one can convey more the other.

It is important to recognise that there is no landscape that has not been influenced by human activity in one way or the other, for example global warming which has been sped up by humanity affects every landscape on Earth, which in turn affects every human on Earth.

Yet conceptually we realise that a lot of layers of meaning can be simultaneously decoded from and projected onto the landscape ( cultural meaning, geographic, geological) and perhaps this is why we focus more on landscape. We also think that the scale of the landscape and the distance at which we photograph somewhat reflects the scale of the global issues that we talk about.

KULTURA DO KWADRATU: When you say, “We are interested in the function of photography as a witness of history”, what do you mean? Do you document a process? After all photography in its very nature is static…

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: we are interested in the relationship between the photograph and time, its historic value and the photograph as an artistic medium something that has an indexical relationship to the period within which it was made.

We as photographers purposefully seek out subject matter that are already or are likely to be historically significant in the future. We therefor make ourselves witnesses of history.

We are documenting changes, some of which are visible and most of which are not. The photograph on its own is very incapable of showing change but in sequence or in comparison to others can show how something has changed or imply that an invisible change may be taking place. For example scientists regularly compare archival images of glaciers to new images taken from the same location to show how much a glacier has melted.

Moving image on the other hand has a far greater capacity to show change, and we do so by using time laps and slow motion, but even moving image is not very capable of showing change on a geological time scale such as a rise in temperature.

KULTURA DO KWADRATU:. What was more important in the representation of the Tibetan plateau :ecological or geopolitical contexts? And what about the spiritual significance of the Tibetan Plateau?

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: There is no geopolitical context without the environmental context, for example it is not possible to talk about the melting of glaciers on the Tibetan plateau without talking about Asian hydro-politics or for example a fishermen in Bangladesh, this is because most of the sources of Asia’s major rivers which provide water for a third of the world’s population are upon the plateau.

We are not interested in the subject of politics itself such as Sino-Tibetan relations, we are interested in the politics of environmental situations, for example those caused by living in an polluted area or an area affected by draught or the subsequent environmental damage cause by the implication of poorly designed polices that were justified by ecological concerns.

It is impossible not to acknowledge the spiritual significance of the Tibetan Plateau and our work dose so to some extent. Yet we intentionally attempt to demystify the cultural identity of the Tibetan Plateau so that we may focus upon the actual living conditions, contemporary culture and the state of the landscape. We also do this to attempt to shift the focus of our viewers toward the global environmental significance of the Tibetan Plateau.

KULTURA DO KWADRATU: Or is it a documentation of a disappearing world, in terms of geology, natural and cultural heritage? Erosion progresses, glaciers are melting, whole swathes of the landscape are becoming desertified, people are having to change from their traditional life style to a contemporary one. When you arrived there, were you able to see these changes that are taking place, or is it going unnoticed?

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: Yes it may be that we create a document that will represent something, a culture, geological formation or person that will no longer exist, but our real intention is to try to represent the ongoing process of change its self.

We do not intend to categorically document a disappearing way of life, we intend to show a state of transition. It is important to acknowledge that modernisation is desired by those residing on the Tibetan Plateau, but that they feel that it should ideally take place without excessive damage to the ecology or heritage of the Plateau.

Yes it has been possible even in the three years that we have been visiting the Plateau to see the changes made by development strategy and policy and to some extent climate change. For example a journey that took nine hours in 2013 took three in 2015 because of the enhancement of the road, and we were able to identify from our photographs that one glacier that we first visited in 2013 and returned to in 2015 had slightly retreated. It is however not possible without scientific measuring devices for us to confidently say that it was warmer of if there was more desertification.

KULTURA DO KWADRATU: How these images were created?, What is your process?

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: We work with medium format film cameras and a broadcast quality HD camera. In order to find the specific locations that we will then photograph, we spend a lot of time researching. We research culturally and scientific important sites and geological and environmental phenomena that we believe will illustrate what we are interested in taking about. Then we spend a lot of time looking at google earth to find accessible landscapes and features like glaciers and create an itinerary.

Once in china we use public transport and when trek independently to the landscape locations that we wish to photograph where we often camp, we utilise a degree of mountaineering skills to reach high altitude objectives.

There is a degree of difficulty in working within the high altitude landscape especially as we carry all our own equipment, food and tent.

Working with film means that we do not see what we have shot until we return to Europe, it also means that we have to be very economic taking only the most important pictures.

Once back in Europe we develop and scan the film, then we worked on the sequencing of the images before printing a small number of them for the exhibition. Alongside this practical work we spend allot of time writing about the images and cementing the formal and conceptual concerns that underpin the work.

KULTURA DO KWADRATU: The Photographs are arranged in pairs, triptychs sequences? What does sequencing signify?

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: The sequencing of images is intended to do several things, the most important of which is to represent change and complexity and give the images a spatial and temporal dimension or space and time.

It is intended to represent the complexity of global systems and their interrelations and the near invisible changes that are inherent to climate change, social political change or psychological change.

It is also intend to suggest our formal evaluation of the medium of photography and highlight our ongoing negotiation with the documentary mode of representation.

Sequencing is somewhat auto-critical of the medium of photography and the documentary mode of representation as it makes visible the making of a representation of a person, place or thing and it also comments upon the inadequacy of the Bressonian decisive moment.

It also means that many subjective interpretations of the works are possible.

We reference several historic photographic and scientific methods in our sequences. The stereo image, the topographic study of the landscape in several sequenced images and the comparative study of images used by glaciologists.

KULTURA DO KWADRATU: You say that your photography has roots in a movement little known in Poland, The New Topographic’s. What is this movement? How does it use photography?

LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING: The new Topographic’s: “photography of a man altered landscape” was a 1975 exhibition curated by William Jenkins in the International museum of photography in Rochester, New York.

The photographers involved all photographed landscape that had been affected by development and common themes included postindustrial structures and landscape, urban development, and the cultural identity of the landscape itself. The exhibition included such photographers as: Robert Adams, and Hiller and Bruno Becher and Steven shore. Most of the photographers worked with large format cameras and exhibited there work in grids and typologies.

Effectively these photographers surveyed there contemporary living environments as if they were cartographers who were discovering the location for the first time and instead of presenting there photographs in a systematized legend they edited them down to the ones that best exemplified their strategy and presented them in the gallery.

A primarily American school of thought It has since become an important movement in the history of photography which many contemporary photographer use as a foundation which they then stack other aesthetic and formal concerns on top of.

we believe that the new topographic strategy of photographing man altered landscapes can seemingly be applied to any landscape, one inhabited by humans (a city) or one totally devoid of human habitation (a desert), as humanity is now understood to affect every  ecosystem therefor ever landscape on earth.

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FEEDBACK LOOPS/ LENA DOBROWOLSKA & TEO ORMOND-SKEAPING/ MPM WROCLAW

Lena Dobrowolska & Teo Ormond-Skeaping, Ice in the age of recession (2015), Archival giclée print from medium format negative, 110x55 cm

Lena Dobrowolska & Teo Ormond-Skeaping, Ice in the age of recession (2015), Archival giclée print from medium format negative, 110×55 cm

Press Release

Lena Dobrowolska and Teo Ormond-Skeaping
Feedback Loops

19 November 2015 – 8 January 2016
Private View: Thursday 19 November, 6-9 pm

MPM is pleased to present Feedback Loops a new exhibition of large scale colour photographic works and an artist film installation by Lena Dobrowolska and Teo Ormond-Skeaping. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery.

Feedback Loops presents works from Dobrowolska’s and Ormond-Skeaping’s ongoing body of work on The Tibetan Plateau that began in 2012 “Time Of The Glacier”.

Dobrowolska and Ormond-Skeaping were drawn to the Tibetan Plateau because of its geo-political importance. Known as the Third Pole the Tibetan Plateau plays a crucial role in global climate and the Asian water cycle. Rising temperatures on the Tibetan Plateau has resulted in rapid glacial retreat and desertification as the permafrost melts and the fragile grass lands deteriorate. As the water tower of Asia dries up hydro-political tension is increasing in Asia and the plateaus influence on the formation of high pressure systems in Eurasia is felt as far away as Europe where summer heat waves have broken all records.

Working with medium format film cameras Dobrowolska and Ormond-Skeaping depict the high altitude plains, geological formations and glaciers, inhabitants and manmade topographies of the Tibetan Plateau documenting development, pollution, desertification and glacial retreat. Working with the region’s cultural archaeology Dobrowolska and Ormond-Skeaping intertwine the ecological and cultural significance of the Plateau, a place revered as the symbolic threshold of human exploration, spirituality and as a crucial climatic component in global warming.

Constructing sequences of images Dobrowolska and Ormond-Skeaping attempt to represent the complexity of global systems and the near invisible changes that are inherent to climate change, social political change or psychological change, the construction of sequences is also intended to highlight their ongoing negotiation with the documentary mode of representation.

Struck by the intangibility of geological, social-political, economic, climate and ecological systems that are visible yet unimaginable Dobrowolska and Ormond-Skeaping document site specific traces that reveal the impact these global systems have upon the landscape of the Tibetan Plateau and the resultant feedback that re-enters the same systems. Dobrowolska and Ormond-Skeaping intend the idea of feedback to imply that every action humanity takes has consequences that feed back through these global systems and return to shape the future in a way we cannot foresee.

Teo Ormond-Skeaping (born 1987, UK ) & Lena Dobrowolska (born 1985, Poland) are a Polish British artist collaboration working with conceptual documentary photography and artist film currently living and working in both England and Poland.

EVENTS: Lena Dobrowolska and Teo Ormond-Skeaping will discuss Feedback Loops with guests.

Lena Dobrowolska (born 1985, Poland) received a MA in Intermedia Art from Art Academy in Cracow 2014 and a BA(Hons) in Photography from Falmouth University in 2010.She was the recipient of the IV edition of Grey House Award, Krakow. Dobrowolska has participated in numerous group exhibitions: Increased difficulty of concentration, Fotograf Festival, Prague (2015), Test Exposure,16th Media Art Biennale, Wro, Wroclaw (2015), Skin, BWA Wroclawa (2015), Intermedia. mov, Kino Lab CSW Warsaw (2014), VideoNews, BWA Labirynt ,Lublin (2014), Winter is Coming, Grey House ,Krakow (2014), Skin, La Maison de la Photographie, Lille (2013), AniMos, MoS Krakow (2013), In progress, Stills Gallery-Scottish Centre for Photography, Edinburgh (2012), Plateau, Photomonth Krakow (2012), Genius Loci, Culture Communication Centre Klaipeda (2012).

Teo Ormond- Skeaping (born 1987, UK) received a MFA from the SLADE School of Art in 2013 and BA(Hons) in Photography from Falmouth University in 2010. Mr Ormond-Skeaping Was a recipient of: The Jealous Print Prize (2013), The Dolbey Travel Scholarship (2013), The Red Mansion Prize ( 2012) and the FOTONOW South West Graduate Prize (2010). Recent exhibitions include: Jealous Gallery, London (2015), Skin, BWA, Wrocław (2015),Prizma Group Show #1, Prizmaspace, Istanbul (2014), The Jealous Gallery at ART 14, The Jealous Gallery and the Saatchi Print Room London, ING Discerning Eye, The Mall Galleries London (2013) and the Red Mansion Art Prize at the Letheby Gallery London( 2013). His works are included in the V&A print archive and private collections.

MPM Gallery (Miejsce przy Miejscu) is a contemporary photography gallery and a branch of the OPT (Ośrodek Postaw Twórczych) institution dedicated to creative arts education based in the Nadodrze district in Wroclaw. The facility includes a gallery space, printmaking studio and an artist’s book and letterpress studio.

For further press information, please contact teo@teoormondskeaping.com

 


MPM  pl. Strzelecki 12, Wrocław, 50-222, Poland  T +48 790 723 723  E luc.machlock@gmail.com

 

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EXETER PHOENIX TALK, TIME OF THE GLACIER & FEED BACK LOOPS

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 Lena Dobrowolska and Teo Ormond-Skeaping

A film screening of “Time of the Glacier” (56min) followed by an artist performance lecture and Q&A session. This session also includes a presentation of recent photographic work “Feedback Loops” from the Tibetan Plateau.

Presented as part of Exeter Phoenix’s Tuesday Collective a monthly inspirational nights featuring a program of talks, screenings and events exploring the creative world of moving image, art and culture.

Tuesday 19th January 7pm

Address: Gandy St, Exeter, Devon EX4 3LS
Phone:01392 667080

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CHARITY AUCTION WARSAW NATIONAL MUSEUM.

Glacial Waterfall I. from the Time of the Glacier archival giclée print from
medium format C-41 negative, artist proof (1/2 AP), 99,5 cm x 78,5 cm, 2015.
 
 New work donated to the charity auction organised by the The Society of Psycho-Oncology

and Promotion of Health, National Museum in Warsaw and Rapex Auction House.

Auction event 14th October 2015 Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw.

With pre-auction exhibition at Stock Exchange Centre in Warsaw 7 -12 October 2015.

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L’EMERGERE DEL POSSIBLE.

Francesco Cazzini has writen extensive reviews (Italian) of Time of the Glacier ,Łokaj,
Orbit Æterna, Earth of the Night and Particle Progress  on his L’emergere del possible
blog which is dedicated to artists and independant film. Below is the rewiew for Łokaj
and you can find  L’emergere del possible HERE!.
 

ŁOKAJ

Łokaj (Inghilterra, 2014, 22′) è senza ombra di dubbio uno dei cortometraggi più rarefatti e disperati/disperanti
su cui ci sia mai capitato di appoggiare lo sguardo. Il tema della desolazione, della solitudine, ritorna, ma ritorna
in maniera differente rispetto a com’era stato posto in Orbit æterna (Inghilterra, 2013, 16′), poiché, se lì la
solitudine seguiva a una catastrofe e faceva con ciò parte del catastrofico nei modi che abbiamo cercato di chiarire,
qui la solitudine è di per se stessa la catastrofe, la quale dura solo un istante, tant’è che, per certi versi, si potrebbe
pensare al cortometraggio di Teo Ormond-Skeaping come a una sorta di variazione su un’unica immagine, che è
appunto quella della solitudine dello scalatore che si è perso. Una foto, di nuovo, rimanda alla mente un tempo
diverso, ma qui, a differenza di Orbit æterna, durante il quale veniva filmata una fotografia ritraente un volto,
traccia di ciò che è ormai passato e non può più essere restituito al presente, la fotografia è il presente, poiché
ritrae la montagna nella quale lo scalatore di trova. Una fotografia, quindi, al presente, ma questo presente è
ora illuminato da una luce diversa rispetto a quella che pensiamo abbia illuminato quelle fotografie quando lo
scalatore le ha avute e che, forse, hanno fatto sorgere in lui il desiderio di scalare quelle montagne: la fotografia
del presente è ora investita da un presente che fa dell’altro presente un passato, poiché in esso inscrive la
malinconia della perdita, il segno di un’ineluttabilità che, certo, era già inscritto ma in maniera non visibile,
non così leggibile. È il presente della solitudine, propriamente la catastrofe. Una catastrofe che mangia il tempo,
scongiurandolo e ripercorrendolo a ritroso, come a dargli un nuovo senso: il catastrofico. Un catastrofico, però,
che è differito, mandato più in là, poiché qui non resta che l’essenza della catastrofe, che è effettivamente un’assenza.
Assenza dell’essenza ed essenza dell’assenza, questi sono i termini chiave per cogliere appieno il cinema di
Teo Ormond-Skeaping, un cinema che potremmo definire, congiungendo e (con)fondendo i due termini, cinema
dell’æssenza. Il denso minimalismo, del resto, non fa che rendere palmare questo senso di perdita, di un minore
che sarebbe dovuto essere un maggiore: è la sconfitta nel momento che antecede la disperazione, la sconfitta in sé,
prima della presa di coscienza, dell’effetto sul corpo. L’effetto sul corpo, la disperazione, non può che venire poi,
e a Ormond-Skeaping non interessa mostrarla, poiché è già lì, inscritta ma non palese, assenza presente: ed è nello
sguardo finale che lo scalatore, rinnovato viandante su un mare di nebbia di friedrichana memoria, getta ai monti
che qualcosa inevitabilmente finisce per lasciar posto a un ineffabile che non può più essere reso per immagine senza
distruggere l’immagine stessa, e cioè il catastrofico. Ma è in quello stesso sguardo, uno sguardo non visto ma soltanto
suggerito, che il nostro stesso sguardo viene rimandato a profondità impossibili da colmare, anche solo o specie con
la vista, ed è a quelle profondità sconsiderate, forse, che siamo tutti infine chiamati a rivolgere non solo lo sguardo
ma anche la nostra stessa vita.
 
THANK YOU! L’EMERGERE DEL POSSIBLE.

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JEALOUS PRIZE WINNERS 2015 EXHIBITION.

  jealous-east_2014
A selection of images from our Graduate prize winners show at the Jealous Shoreditch Gallery
including my print ORBIT ÆTERNA from the 2014 prize. The exhibition is on from Thursday
9th July 2015 to Sunday 2nd August 2015.
Jealous Gallery Shoreditch
53 Curtain Road, Shoreditch,
EC2A 3PT
tel. 020 7739 4107

More information Here. 

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SKÓRA/SKIN, BWM Wrocław, Poland,  30th January to 15th March 2015.

skora

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PRIZMA GROUP SHOW #1 | OPENING: 20.11.2014 | 18:00

Prisma

 

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TIME OF THE GLACIER

image

A NEW FILM.

2.35:1, HD large scale production, 56 Min, 2014.

Here is a 5 minute excerpt.

Time Of The Glacier Excerpt from teo ormond-skeaping on Vimeo.

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NEW PRINT

 

ORBIT ÆTERNA PRINT WITH JEALOUS!

Print in two parts. First part: 10 colour screen print on Somerset Tub Sized 410 gsm. Second Part: Digital Inkjet Archival Print on Harman Gloss Baryta by Hahnemuhle 320 gsm Paper. Part One 103.5 x 86.5 cm (cut edge), Part Two 12.5 x 16.8 cm (cut edge).

Year 2014.

Edition 25.

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WHITE LOUPE

All I wish is that I could explain, but I know I would doubt it the moment I did. But what I experience, what I take from not being able to explain has become far more important.

I have come to believe that photography may be considered a collection of experiences. That conscious or unconscious, the collection is an acknowledgement of an interaction or process that is considered by the artist to be of a certain value at a certain time.

If that were so we could consider that an experience, and therefore an image, may be valued higher because it is “New” to the individual; assuming there is a base level of experiences that have been collected so often that they no longer hold any value.

This base of experiences would conceivably grow with the pursuit of the valuable “New” experience, the process both condemning the world of available experiences and perpetuating its confrontation. And though it is not possible to have confronted a finite number of experiences the “New” experience would become increasingly rare, as experiences are grouped upon discovery by their similarity’s to avoid the repetitive confrontation of similar occurrences.

We could consider that the highest level of experience would be the metaphysical. This would be an experience that cannot be defined, that in some way an occurrence momentarily represented a semi-conscious understanding of a connected series of preceding and subsequent events that had defined an experience, which the conscious mind cannot retain.